Are we really semi- Pelagians and don’t know it?

Today the 3rd of July in 529 was The Synod of Orange. There was a group Led by the ‘Augustinians‘ of the day, (somewhat forceable group too). After exerting influence, the synod upheld Augustine’s doctrines of grace and free will while condemning the views of Semi-Pelagians, including John Cassian and Faustus of Riez. They believed the human will and God’s grace work together.

Now think about the early patristics, the mystics, the desert mothers and fathers, what we as people on the path of contemplation have been reading, studying, and reflecting on over the years.

The Synod of Orange is one of the most important councils of the early Church. We hear this topic of semi- Pelagians thinking comes alive during the Reformation as evidence that the Papist had abandoned the theology of its own Council Fathers and Church Doctors.

Where would we find “semi-Pelagians” today? Closer than you would think? 😀😀

For those who are Papist, do we think that the Church is more semi-pelagian because of the Second Vatican Council?

It is also interesting to view this from the Eastern Orthodox or Eastern Rites perspective…remember neither use or reference the theology of Augustine in their own theology.

Then consider Teilhard de Chardin was he a semi-pelagian? And being the technology zealot I am, I find it interesting the influences technology is now having on theology. One thing we all know is that myth expresses reality, and reality is expressed by myth. (keep in mind myth in religion, is not used in meaning as we do in the Western Culture). Religion is in and of itself ‘myth-making’; it is how we explain and express our encounters with the significant other we call God. So I am finding that technology is “asking us” maybe to express some of our myths. Is technology helping us remake ‘religion‘ similar to what the patristics encountered during their time, culture, and tools in life?

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